Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s been an interesting week.  To begin with, I did not start my new career as Marian the Librarian on Wednesday after all.  It seems that there is some paperwork that needs to be completed by HR before I can start.  So on Wednesday I went down, turned in my paperwork, let them photocopy my driver’s license (proof that I actually exist and am a legal US citizen and all), and then headed off to work the desk at our weekly swing dance.  It’s been a little frustrating.  I don’t mind not starting on Wednesday so much, but until HR gives its ok I can’t get my work schedule.  I know that the new job will require some odd hours, including some evenings, so until I know which evenings, it’s a little difficult to plan things.  For instance, I want to hang out with Ani and Johnsy, and maybe watch some West Wing, something we haven’t done in way, way too long.  But until I know which evenings I’ll be free, the best I can say is that we could do it on a particular evening, probably.  Which drives me a little nuts.

Also this week, the Swing Club started back up with its usual bang.  This time Bounce and I taught basic East Coast Swing to 105 students, almost evenly balanced between leads and follows (a miracle!).  Lots of them stayed to dance afterwards, which was great.  Madame President had been thinking hard all summer about the club, the lessons, and had come up with lots of ideas to try out.  I think a lot of them worked, and helped the evening be a great success.

In other news, I’ve started reading Philosophy again.  It’s been a long time for me.  I think it was so hard when my school plans crashed and burned that I couldn’t even think about it for a while.  Plus, I’m much better about reading things that take actual effort when I have a class or other deadline to motivate me.  However, recently a new friend e-mailed me an article about (among other things) the philosophy of Max Scheler, a German philosopher who was a huge influence on John Paul II.  It was a fascinating article, particularly since I’d been curious about Scheler since JohnJohn was so enthusiastic about him back in the day.  Also, Scheler has a connection to Edith Stein, my own personal favorite modern saint, patron to single Catholic women everywhere, and the subject of one of the first big research papers I did.  Anyway, PJ’s paper inspired me to finally actually read me some Scheler, so last week found me looking up Scheler on Amazon and ordering Ressentiment, a phenomenological study of resentment.  It came a few days ago, and I’ve been reading it in small chunks when I get a chance ever since.  I still haven’t gotten past the Introduction, but so far it’s been fascinating.

People keep asking me if I’m “ready” for the long holiday weekend coming up, as if it were some sort of terrifying challenge we were all going to have to face and triumph over.  Granted, one more day to sleep in is always welcome, but it’s one day, folks.  I think I can handle it.  So far it does look like it’ s going to be full.  Last night Mom decided that we were going to have a family cookout.  First she tried to get Rosie to agree to host it at our house, but Rosie (thankfully) was able to plead the current state of painting/home renovation related turmoil our apartment seems to live in.  So it’s going to be over at the Family Homestead after all.  I will, as always, be making potato salad.  It’s rather nice to have a dish that’s so universally loved, though I think I’m going to get very bored of it right about, say, Monday.  A couple of the guys from our Catholic Life young adult group are having a cookout on Monday too, followed by saying a rosary together at the Lourdes Grotto at Bergamo.  It sounds like a nice, Good Catholic time.

I should also mention that, as of yesterday, I have completely transferred all of the blog posts from my old xanga blog to here on WordPress.  So, if you would like, you can check out “The Vault” in the right hand column, and find all my blog posts going back to February of 2005.  Enjoy!

Advertisements